Evolution rx a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing. Evolution and Training: An Interview with Dr. William Meller 2019-01-27

Evolution rx a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing Rating: 7,4/10 1723 reviews

Evolution Rx by William F. Meller · OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

evolution rx a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing

In addition, Meller's chapters on sexuality and psychology read more like oversimplified surveys of somewhat speculative theories. Why not to stretch before exercise? Evolution and Training: An Interview with Dr. In general, gossip is looked at as a bad thing. The most important thing in life after physical strength of course is the ability to critically assess the information we recieve - and in the days of the interweb we get a lot of it. The book itself is more of an overview of Dr. This is his first article in the fitness industry since 1969, and we are honored that he has chosen to place it with us. Most of us are overhydrated, Meller said.

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Evolution Rx : a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing (Book, 2009) [www.thelittlegazette.com]

evolution rx a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing

But how and what to eat is only the beginning of what human evolution can teach about health. And most people are excellent at gossip, whether they admit it or not, Meller said. A discussion of how Crohn's disease patients who were treated with a benign intestinal parasite experienced significant recovery and a look at the numerous studies showing how kids raised in environments with animals and dirt have fewer allergies seems to support this theory. Why children should be encouraged to get dirty Review William Meller, M. In his chapter on Vitamin D, for example, he dismisses supplements and recommends instead getting 30 minutes of sun 3 times a week. But how and what to eat is only the beginning of what human evolution can teach about health.

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Book Review: Evolution Rx: A Practical Guide to Harnessing Our Innate Capacity for Health and Healing by William Meller

evolution rx a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing

However, there is a good reason for this, the book is written in such a way that it is approachable for non-medical, non-science and more typical background. Nature never anticipated the easy access of high-fructose corn syrup, however, and Meller attributes our current obesity epidemic to the fact that we have simply gotten too good at satisfying cravings that at one time were crucial for our survival. The book reads as a how-to guide of sorts, where Dr. Along a similar vein, Meller devotes another chapter to the current bugaboo of toxins. Meller on the Skepticality podcast and knew for sure I needed to read this book. Much evidence suggests that Stone Age people ate foods rich in protein and fats, not carbohydrates, for example. If sunshine were so dangerous, how could Stone Age people have spent their entire lives outdoors, mostly naked, and not dropped like flies from skin cancer? Evolution, he asserts, was pretty smart when it put us together, and many of our current health problems can be traced to the fact that the circumstances in which we currently live vary greatly from those which our bodies adapted to over millions of years.

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evolution rx a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing

I heard an interview with Dr. In his book, Meller answers age-old questions such as: When is pain good for us? Others, however, appear to have less solid scientific grounding or contradict other research I've seen. That being said, I don't think I would have enjoyed the book as much if I hadn't heard the interview. I also know that there are people out there who might totally disagree with it, and that's Just Fine. With only a basic vocabulary, Meller said, Stone Age people could communicate what they needed to know such as who was sleeping with whom, who got the bigger piece of meat, who stole food from whom and who was the dominant male.

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Evolution Rx: A Practical Guide to Harnessing Our Innate Capacity for Health and Healing

evolution rx a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing

While I found these sections interesting, I had less confidence in what he was saying. Meller on the Skepticality podcast and knew for sure I needed to read this book. Meller, one of the country's pre-eminent practitioners of evolutionary medicine, explores such topics as:? I think we're talking about optimums here rather than absolute physical laws. Why getting more sun leads to better health? William Meller by Jim Steel Dr. .

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Evolution Rx : a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing (Book, 2009) [www.thelittlegazette.com]

evolution rx a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing

In women, a curvy 7-10 ratio is most desirable. William Meller is the author of Evolution Rx: A Practical Guide to Harnessing Our Innate Capacity for Health and Healing. Based on the latest research, Evolution Rx provides readers with an understanding of the underlying science and a practical means to making nutritional and lifestyle changes, from exercise and injury prevention to addressing allergies, heart health, cancer, and more. They likely spoke a rudimentary language with only about 1,000 words. He tells us not to push our dietary ethics onto our children e. In all, it's an easy and quick read, and it will make you think. Why humans can't register fullness when eating carbohydrates, and what to do about it? If you want more on the science, look for additional interviews and material to find out what is going on behind the pages.

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Evolution Rx by William F. Meller · OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

evolution rx a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing

In evolutionary medicine, when researchers find capabilities that people are very good at and spend a lot of time on, they look for reasons that skill might have been important in earlier times and been selected to evolve. Primitive attractions such as physique, strength and a forceful nature played a huge rule in the process of sexual selection. It's just that it's a Good Thing to do. A revolutionary-yet simple and practical-guide to staying fit and healthy based on evolutionary medicine. Overall, I found this book useful in that it effectively and logically debunks a number of common unproven ideas about human health.

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Evolution RX A Practical Guide to Harnessing Our Innate Capacity for Health & Healing: William Meller: Hardcover: 9780399534959: Powell's Books

evolution rx a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing

William Meller takes a broad look at human health through the lens of the developing field of evolutionary medicine. But Meller contends gossip can be good because it tells us the limits of our society. He tells us not to push our dietary ethics onto our children e. Why humans can't register fullness when eating carbohydrates, and what to do about it? The interview went far more in death into some of the topics that the book only touches on. Meller believes that by arming ourselves with knowledge of how our bodies have evolved and where our behaviors came from, we can make better decisions on how we treat our bodies today. But how and what people eat is only the beginning of what the study of human evolution can teach us about ov A revolutionary-yet simple and practical-guide to staying fit and healthy based on evolutionary medicine.

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Evolution Rx by William F. Meller · OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries

evolution rx a practical guide to harnessing our innate capacity for health and healing

Also, while his suggestion that we should solve our dietary problems by returning to a meat-dominant Paleolithic diet may have grounding in evolutionary theory, it's an unrealistic solution for a planet of limited resources and a population pushing 7 billion. William Meller takes a broad look at human health through the lens of the developing field of evolutionary medicine. But I think in his effort to make what is ultimately a highly complex topic accessible, Meller both oversimplifies and overreaches. Though he sometimes strains to connect illnesses, diet and behavior to their presumed prehistoric roots, he nonetheless provides sensible guidance on preventing disease and promoting health. He traces everything back to thinking about how our ancient ancestors evolved to adapt to a world that was constantly trying to kill them. We evolved in environments in which food was relatively scarce, so the cravings we developed for sweet and fatty things were to ensure that we stocked up on these precious resources whenever we came across them.

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