Linnaeus nature and nation. Linnaeus. Nature and Nation 2019-03-18

Linnaeus nature and nation Rating: 8,2/10 1549 reviews

Linnaeus: nature and nation

linnaeus nature and nation

Jealous of British colonial and scientific success, Linnaeus promoted schemes for naturalising food crops such as tea, rice and olives to improve Swedish economic self-sufficiency. It is, indeed, Linnaean in spirit. Meticulously researched, and based on archival data, Linnaeus will be of compelling interest to historians of the Enlightenment, historians of economics, and historians of science. Instead, in a series of linked essays, Lisbet Koerner repositions Linnaeus primarily as a Swede rather than as a member of an international intellectual community. An easily accessible taxonomic knowledge base is critically important for all biodiversity-related sciences.

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Linnaeus

linnaeus nature and nation

Traditionally, and often implicitly, it is often assumed that emerging groups of potential knowledge users have their own organizational preferences and demands influencing the setup of new hybrid organizations. Her narrative goes against the grain of Linnaean scholarship old and new by analyzing not how modern Linnaeus was, but how he understood science in his time. And in recovering him, she has done something few do. Linnaeus: Nature and Nation offers something different. For this to be possible, foresters must be able to identify species and understand how species are defined. At the same time, his attempts to organize a state economy according to principles of science prefigured an idea that has become one of the defining features of modernity. She has shown a way in which the eighteenth century and its 'enlightened' projects grew out of the seventeenth century and its 'baroque' ones.

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Linnaeus: Nature and Nation

linnaeus nature and nation

Finally, and poignantly, Koerner portrays Linnaeus as a man who failed at his life-long goal of making Sweden economically self-sufficient through the science of natural history. The text is written with wit and irony. New Scientist Review Carl Linneaus' legacy is generally considered his system of plant classification. Linnaeus hoped to reproduce the economy of empire and colony within the borders of his family home by growing cash crops in Northern Europe. The path was not plain in the eighteenth century, and it is not, Koerner suggests, so clear now. For all enquiries, please contact Herb Tandree Philosophy Books directly - customer service is our primary goal. The radical savant described here is neither the solitary meditator, nor the participant in communal knowledge-gathering projects for national glory Bacon, Linnaeus.

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Linnaeus : nature and nation (Book, 1999) [www.thelittlegazette.com]

linnaeus nature and nation

By applying the concepts epistemic and academic drift, it will be argued here, however, that internal organizational dynamics are just as important as changing historical conjunctures in the uses of science when understanding why new hybrid organizations are formed. This chapter concludes by explaining how ecological validity and ecological thinking in general provide public engagement with science both concrete guidelines for better research and heuristics for evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of competing engagement methods. Koerner's perspective is interesting and yields some new insights. Single-handedly, Linnaeus standardized the naming and classifying of plants and animals based on morphological characteristics with his now famous binormial nomenclature--the first name is the organism's genus, the second its species. Placing Linnaeus's botanical studies in the larger context of his life's work, Koerner explores his ideas about the relationship between nature and national economics. The genius of Linnaeus and his successors was to solve this problem using the technology available in a day of purely printed publication and slow communications via an unreliable post Blunt, 1984; Koerner, 1999. In this well-written book, the author concentrates on two big themes: Linnaeus' concerns about his own nation and his contributions to science.

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9780674005655: Linnaeus: Nature and Nation

linnaeus nature and nation

Instead, in a series of linked essays, Lisbet Koerner repositions Linnaeus primarily as a Swede rather than as a member of an international intellectual community. This is a book about what Koerner calls the 'long forgotten future of the past. Astute and engaging; not only a useful treatment of the economic relatives of Linneaus' well-known taxonomy, but also a taxonomy of its own, that of genus Linneaus, species intellectual imagination. He for it is always a he in this case is less a producer of a stable, cumulative body of knowledge than a destabilizer of forms of existing knowledge Species concepts and the definition of a species are discussed in the context of sustainable forest management and the sustainability of biological systems in general. Koerner shows us the often surprising ways he embarked on this project. In retrospect, the success of Linnean taxonomy was probably the result of its functionality, its relative democracy—anyone could contribute to the taxonomic project—and the conflict resolution mechanisms that Linnaeus initiated but were later developed and enshrined in the still-evolving Zoological and Botanical Codes of Nomenclature International Commission for Zoological Nomenclature, 1999; McNeill et al. It is, indeed, Linnaean in spirit.

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Linnaeus: Nature and Nation

linnaeus nature and nation

It was in the course of those labours that he invented the naming and filing system that still brings order to the world's flora and fauna. A certain gentle irony pervades this book and its view of history. Linnaeus: Nature and Nation offers something different. Thanks to Koerner, Linnaeus has become one of my favorite eighteenth-century figures. Koerner shows us the often surprising ways he embarked on this project. Koerner's narrative goes against the grain of scholarship old and new by analyzing not how modern Linnaeus was, but how he understood science in his time.

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Linnaeus: Nature and Nation

linnaeus nature and nation

. Indeed, it was argued that these two facets of society should be viewed as inseparable from each other, distinguishing the movement from more modern conceptions of economics. But this engaging, often funny, and sometimes tragic portrait of a great man will be valued by general readers as well. Linnaeus: Nature and Nation offers something different. Two Linnaean names within this subgenus still remain untypified: P. Thanks to Koerner, Linnaeus has become one of my favorite eighteenth-century figures. He was also a doctor, teacher, economist, and theologian.

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Linnaeus : nature and nation (Book, 2001) [www.thelittlegazette.com]

linnaeus nature and nation

Laqueur Taxon In an extraordinarily thorough research of Linnaeus's Swedish and Latin publications, manuscript correspondence, diaries, and lecture notes, Lisbet Koerner relates the quest for natural knowledge to the ultimate goals of nation-building and eighteenth-century cameralist economics. Basic taxonomic information, such as specimen-level data, location of types, and name catalogues are already available, at least for some groups, on the Web. She argues that Linnaeus' scientific goals helped lead to economic growth and independence for his homeland, Sweden. Koerner, drawing on a wide spectrum of sources, places her fascinating subject firmly within the context of eighteenth-century European thought, and reveals Linnaeus' grand plan for applying his systematization of nature to politics and economics in the hope of transforming Sweden into a self-sufficient state. Drawing on letters, poems, notebooks, and secret diaries, Lisbet Koerner tells the moving story of one of the most famous naturalists who ever lived, the Swedish-born botanist and systematizer, Carl Linnaeus.

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