Raising expectations and raising hell my decade fighting for the labor movement. Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell): My Decade Fighting for the Labor Movement 2019-03-02

Raising expectations and raising hell my decade fighting for the labor movement Rating: 4,3/10 1164 reviews

Raising Expectations (And Raising Hell)

raising expectations and raising hell my decade fighting for the labor movement

It also covers hierarchical, entrenched labor unions and problems with their current strategies. Bob Ostertag is the co-author of Raising Expectations and Raising Hell and author of People's Movements, People's Press: The Journalism of Social Justice Movements and Creative Life: Music, Politics, People, and Machines. I'll never be able to thank my Dad enough. This was an extremely engaging book that contains many important lessons for union movements in developed countries - highly recommended for workplace activists and union organisers. Within five days, it submitted a petition signed by a majority at both hospitals demanding combined negotiations. Contracts at two major hospitals were expiring in four to six weeks.

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Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell): My Decade Fighting for the Labor Movement (Paperback)

raising expectations and raising hell my decade fighting for the labor movement

This is especially interesting in our current moment because nurses' unions have seen renewed political power and Las Vegas has become a de facto hub for union resurgence thanks to the Culinary Union. This threat looms even on the brightest days of big wins in Connecticut and Nevada until the storm finally breaks and internecine point-scoring threatens to scorch the earth of worker-led victories. Collective and selective incentives are discussed. In a referendum, 98% of the voting nurses voted to authorize a strike. Then she was bounced from the movement, a victim of the high-level internecine warfare that has torn apart organized labor. Destructive, because as your organisation becomes sufficiently large and complex - fractures between interests will appear which undermine both the organising and the organisation particularly as external circumstances change.

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Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell); My Decade Fighting for the Labor Movement by Jane F. McAlevey

raising expectations and raising hell my decade fighting for the labor movement

Without that nothing else happens. I can't think of another book I would consider more essential reading on the American labor movement that has been written in the past decade. If you've got one, direct me to it. Raising Expectations And Raising Hell My Decade Fighting for the Labor Movement New York: Verso, 2012 This book renews my faith that organizing works. But in negotiations, management was now playing tough and mean.

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Raising Expectations (And Raising Hell)

raising expectations and raising hell my decade fighting for the labor movement

In this engrossing and funny narrative—that reflects the personality of its charismatic, wisecracking author—McAlevey tells the story of a number of dramatic organizing and contract victories, and the unconventional strategies that helped achieve them. The final hours were tense, the financial details complex, but in the end, McAlevey reports, it was a total union victory. The E-mail message field is required. Raising Expectations and Raising Hell argues that labor can be revived, but only if the movement acknowledges its mistakes and fully commits to deep organizing, participatory education, militancy, and an approach to workers and their communities that more resembles the campaigns of the 1930s - in short, social movement unionism that involves raising workers' expectations while raising hell. And yet, in the middle of the 2000s, in the right-to-work state of Nevada with a corrupt local union, McAlevey's organising strategies and principles turned this local into one of the toughest and most successful in the country. Today, less than 7 percent ofAmerican private-sector workers belong to a union, the lowest percentage sincethe beginning of the twentieth century, and public employee collectivebargaining has been dealt devastating blows in Wisconsin and elsewhere.

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Raising Expectations and Raising Hell

raising expectations and raising hell my decade fighting for the labor movement

A toast-scorching Las Vegas mid-summer was no time for extended picket lines. It can be done, she tells us, here is how we did it. Once I started reading it, there was no stopping. In the battles McAlevey recounts, hardly anyone comes out standing tall. This rousing memoir of McAlevey's decade-long experience as a union organizer spares neither the companies nor the union bosses. Expectancy-value theory is applied to movement participation and mobilization.

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Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell); My Decade Fighting for the Labor Movement by Jane F. McAlevey

raising expectations and raising hell my decade fighting for the labor movement

It calls for a new kind of unionism and makes a compelling case for a new vision for the American labor movement. McAlevey got the bad news. McAlevey is not a writer first: she is an organizer, an agitator, a radical. Jane McAlevey uses her own experiences in a movement that has been undergoing dramatic changes—within a workforce that has undergone even greater changes—to suggest to the reader the necessity and potential for a transformation of the union movement into a real labor movement. Workers becoming leaders, workers themselves organising, being proactive and taking ownership over their union campaigns and workplace fights, these are the things can go some way to turning the labour movement around. When this is perceived by the old guard as an affront, resources are squandered, talent is wasted and the only real winners are the bosses. These are the politics of revolutionary socialism.

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Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell): My Decade Fighting for the Labor Movement (Paperback)

raising expectations and raising hell my decade fighting for the labor movement

When McAlevey first came to Nevada, she had little respect for the old local leadership. I would recommend this for all young people exploring working in the movement, though be prepared obviously for a bit more movement-veneer to be tarnished - it shows some ways forwards within a regressive system, yet is a reminder that this is a fight that never ends in victory. In this engrossing and funny narrative—that reflects the personality of its charismatic, wisecracking author—McAlevey tells the story of a number of dramatic organizing and contract victories, and the unconventional strategies that helped achieve them. Lastly, there is just a ton of rather direct, bitter, personal attacks and score settling that are not particularly discreet. This article is based upon an interrogation of two books: Gregg Shotwell, Autoworkers Under the Gun: A Shop-Floor View of the End of the American Dream; and Jane McAlevey with Bob Ostertag, Raising Expectations And Raising Hell : My Decade Fighting For the Labor Movement New York: Verso Books, 2012.

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Raising Expectations Raising Hell My Decade…

raising expectations and raising hell my decade fighting for the labor movement

But her story, along with those of so many brave health care workers, fills me with hope. Bosses and their associations all but echo the same arguments. New insights in psychology are combined with resource mobilization theory in an attempt to overcome the weaknesses of traditional social-psychological approaches to social movements. Jane McAlevey gives us an on-the-ground account of the obstacles the union hierarchy throws in the path of a bold and energetic organizing effort that scored a string of brilliant successes before the hierarchy cracked down. Then she was bounced from the movement, a victim of the high-level internecine warfare that has torn apart organized labor.

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Raising expectations (and raising hell) : my decade fighting for the labor movement in SearchWorks catalog

raising expectations and raising hell my decade fighting for the labor movement

In the 'whole worker theory' that McAlevey tested and retested in real life campaigns, all the issues negatively impacting the poor, working and middle class become the cause of unions, not simply wages and narrowly defined workplace conditions. Looking at the great upsurges in union history, one would be hard-pressed to not find a radical buried deep within those struggles, at the heart of the fight. In this engrossing and funny narrative—that reflects the personality of its charismatic, wisecracking author—McAlevey tells the story of a number of dramatic organizing and contract victories, and the unconventional strategies that helped achieve them. Jane McAlevey uses her own experiences in a movement that has been undergoing dramatic changes—within a workforce that has undergone even greater changes—to suggest to the reader the necessity and potential for a transformation of the union movement into a real labor movement. It calls for a new kind of unionism and makes a compelling case for a new vision for the American labor movement. This is a fantastic, highly-readable book that you should read.

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Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell): My Decade Fighting for the Labor Movement (Paperback)

raising expectations and raising hell my decade fighting for the labor movement

In this right-to-work state, where workers need not pay the equivalent of dues, union membership had fallen to dangerous levels. Then she was bounced from the movement, a victim of the high-level internecine warfare that has torn apart organized labor. If you work for a union, this stuff might be a page-turner, but for rank and file civilians like myself, it can get a little bogged down. My continued support of unions is my way of showing my Dad that I appreciate all of the sacrifices he made for our family. Jane's book was recommended to me by a friend who used to work with her.

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